Using Literals to coding in Javascript/JS

This JavaScript tutorial explains how to use literals (string, number, boolean and null) in JavaScript with examples.

Description

We’ll cover 4 kinds of literals – string literals, quantity literals, boolean literals and null literals.

String Literals

String literals are usually surrounded by single fees (‘) or double fees (“).

For example:

'ABC'
'TechOnTheNet'

"ABC"
"TechOnTheNet"

In JavaScript, you can declare a variable named h and give it the string value of ‘TechOnTheNet’.

var h = 'TechOnTheNet';

or

var h = "TechOnTheNet";

Number Literals

Number literals can be written with or except decimal places. Number literals can be either nice numbers or bad numbers. If you do now not specify a sign, then a fantastic quantity is assumed. Here are some examples of valid quantity literals:

15
3.14
-23

In JavaScript, you can declare a variable named counter and supply it the numeric price of 15.

var counter = 15;

Boolean Literals

Boolean literals can both be genuine or false. These values are exceptional keywords in JavaScript and do not need quotes. Here are the two types of Boolean literals:

true
false

In JavaScript, you can declare a variable named observed and supply it the Boolean value of false.

var found = false;

Null Literals

Null literals are a unique literal price in JavaScript. A null represents the absence of a value. Here is a null literal:

null

In JavaScript, you can declare a variable named h and supply it a fee of null.

var h = null;